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Eight Irish authors in longlist for top literary prize


Eight Irish authors in longlist for top literary prize

Eight Irish authors are among the 154 on the longlist for the world’s richest literary prize – the highest ever number.
Libraries worldwide have nominated the writers for the €100,000 International Impac Dublin Literary Award, alongside 43 American, 22 British and 12 Canadian novels.
Belfast-born author Jane Gillespie has been nominated for her debut novel, 'The Map of Time'.
Lord Mayor of Dublin Naoise O Muiri, patron of the award, commended its promotion of excellence in world literature and the opportunity to promote Irish writing internationally.
“This is the highest number of translated novels, first novels and novels by Irish authors to be nominated, since the Impac Dublin Award’s inception in 1996,” he said.
“Like every year you will find new books and new authors, particularly those novels in translation that you might otherwise never come across and you can pit yourself against the international panel of judges and pick your own favourite novel.”
The nominated Irish titles are:
* 'On Canaan’s Side' by Sebastian Barry, nominated by San Diego Public Library, USA and by Dublin City Public Libraries, Ireland.
* 'City of Bohane' by Kevin Barry, nominated by Cork City Libraries, Limerick City Library and Dublin City Public Libraries.
* 'The Absolutist' by John Boyne, nominated by Liverpool City Library & Information Services, UK and Tampere City Library, Finland.
* 'The Dulang Washer' by Paul Callan, nominated by The National Library of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpar.
* 'Long Time, No See' by Dermot Healy nominated by Bergen Offentlige Bibliotek, Norway and The Library for Foreign Literature, Moscow, Russia.
* 'Cold Eye of Heaven' by Christine Dwyer Hickey, nominated by Bergen Offentlige Bibliotek, Norway
* 'Twice Born' by (Irish/Italian) author Margaret Mazzantini, nominated by Waterford County Library, Ireland and by Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Roma, Italy.
* 'Double Talk' by Patrick Warner (now living in Canada), nominated by The Provincial Resource Library, St John’s, Newfoundland, Canada.
The award is organised by Dublin City Public Libraries.
The favourite for the award is 2011 Man Booker prize winner and the most nominated book, The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes, with 15 nominations.
The shortlist for the Impac award will be announced on April 9 next year with the winner being announced on June 6.
Previous Irish winners were 'Let the Great World Spin' by Colum McCann in 2011, and in 2006, 'The Master' by Colm Toibin.

Does Ireland really host one of the world's richest literary prizes?


Does Ireland really host one of the world's richest literary prizes?

We heard earlier today that eight Irish authors have been nominated for 'one of the world's richest literary prizes'. We want to know what exactly the award is and who the eight authors are?
What’s all this I’m hearing about some Irish authors being up for a ‘rich’ book award?
Well the ‘rich book award’ in question is actually the IMPAC DUBLIN Literary Award. It’s known as ‘one of the world’s richest literary prizes’ because it’s in the top 20 richest awards; the Nobel Prize for Literature comes in at number one with a prize of €1million. The IMPAC DUBLIN Literary Award hands out a cool €100,000.
Wait a minute, it’s in Dublin? How long has this been going on for?
Yes, surprisingly enough, the IMPAC DUBLIN Literary Award is held in Dublin. A total of 154 books have been nominated for the 2013 Award and they’re giving people the opportunity to have a read of them before the winner is announced.
The five judges will also have to read all 154 novels in order to pick the best, so that's partly why the 'longlist' has been announced now. The judges are comprised of the Irish author Patrick McCabe, Salim Bachi, an Algerian novelist, Krista Kaer, an Estonian translator, Kamila Shamsie, a novelist from Pakistan based in London and Clive Sinclair, a British author.
The award was first given out back in 1996 and this year sees the most Irish novelists nominated since its inception.
But what exactly is the award? What’s it for and who gets to decide who's in it?
Well, The IMPAC DUBLIN Literary Award is an international literary award for a work of fiction and authors are nominated by libraries from all over the world. Books don’t have to be written in English in order to be nominated but they have to be at least translated from their native language - so it’s a fairly prestigious international award.
Basically, a library anywhere in the world could nominate your book for the award, even though you're not from that country or you've never been to it.
Oh right, so who are the Irish novelists up for the €100,000 award?
The Irish titles up for the nomination are:
On Canaan’s Side by Sebastian Barry, nominated by San Diego Public Library, USA and by Dublin City Public Libraries, Ireland.
City of Bohane by Kevin Barry, nominated by Cork City Libraries, Limerick City Library and Dublin City Public Libraries, Ireland.
The Absolutist by John Boyne, nominated by Liverpool City Library & Information Services, UK and Tampere City Library, Finland.
The Dulang Washer by Paul Callan, nominated by The National Library of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpar.
Long Time, No See by Dermot Healy nominated by Bergen Offentlige Bibliotek, Norway and The Library for Foreign Literature, Moscow, Russia.
The Cold Eye of Heaven by Christine Dwyer Hickey, nominated by Bergen Offentlige Bibliotek, Norway.
Twice Born by (Irish/Italian) author Margaret Mazzantini, nominated by Waterford County Library, Ireland and by Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Roma, Italy.
Double Talk by Patrick Warner (now living in Canada), nominated by The Provincial Resource Library, St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada.
I see, well fair play to them. So what’s the ‘must read’ book out of the lot?
Well the most nominated book is The Sense of an Ending by English writer, Julian Barnes, which received 15 nominations from libraries in Australia, Belgium, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Germany, Greece, Ireland, the Netherlands, the UK and the USA.
So it’s a safe bet that it’s a good read. It’s available for next to nothing over on Amazon.


Alma Classics has just published a new edition of James Joyce's Ulysses ....A must have for any Joyce fan






Alma Classics has just published a new edition of James Joyce's Ulysses .
Based on the 1939 version of Ulysses, our edition includes over 9,000 notes by Sam Slote of Trinity College, Dublin, in an easy to consult format.
 
Sam Slote on annotating Ulysses:  "Up until now the only real player in the annotation town is the volume by Don Gifford (with Robert Seldman), Ulysses Annotated, University of Chicago. This is just a volume of annotations (there is another, earlier volume, Allusions in Ulysses by Weldon Thorton, which is not quite as comprehensive as Gifford).
The currently available text plus annotated editions (Declan Kiberd for Penguin and Jeri Johnson for Oxford World Classics) basically just extract and condense from Gifford without adding much in the way of new material.
 My notes are all-new and correct various mistakes Gifford made since its last revised edition in 1988... I'm reasonably scrupulous about identifying my sources and in comparison to the Kiberd and Johnson text plus annotations volumes, my notes are much more comprehensive. There's information there for the novice reader but also for the more 'seasoned' reader as well."